Central Valley Flood Protection Board Home

Reports

1998 Annual Report

Table of Contents


    Introduction

    The Reclamation Board was created by the California Legislature in 1911 to carry out a comprehensive flood control plan for the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. It is the State agency that cooperates with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in controlling flooding along the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and tributaries. For nearly 90 years, the Board has acted as liaison between the State of California and the United States and residents, property owners, and agencies in the Central Valley. In that role, the Board provides an open forum where all interests may express their views to help resolve questions regarding flood management. The governor appoints the seven members of the Board.

    The Board governs the Sacramento and San Joaquin Drainage District, which extends through 14 counties and comprises 1.7 million acres lying along the most flood-prone portions of the two rivers, and also has jurisdiction throughout the drainage basin of the Central Valley. Under California law, no reclamation project of any kind may be started or carried out on or near the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers or their tributaries until plans have first been approved by the Board. The Board’s efforts focus on controlling floodwater; reducing flood damage; protecting land from floodwater erosion that would affect project levees; and controlling encroachment into floodplains and onto flood control works, such as levees, channels, and pumping plants.

    The Board uses both structural and nonstructural measures to accomplish its purposes. It assists the Corps, the federal agency that funds and builds flood control projects, by providing lands, easements, rights of way, and relocations. When a project is completed, the Board accepts responsibility for the project and usually turns it over to a local agency to operate and maintain. The Board also plans and adopts designated floodways, which are nonstructural means of ensuring the safe passage of floodflows through flood-prone areas. The Board has adopted more than 1,300 miles of designated floodways in the Central Valley.

    In carrying out its programs to meet flood control needs, the Board considers the environmental effects of its actions and meets legal requirements regarding environmental concerns. The Board and its staff, which is all provided by the Department of Water Resources, work closely with the Department of Fish and Game and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to consider the impacts of flood control works on fish and wildlife. The Board leases about 6,800 acres of its land to DFG as wildlife habitat.

    The purpose of this report is to highlight some of the Board’s more significant activities in 1998.

    General Investigations

    American River Watershed (Long-Term) Project

    Background

    Sacramento has one of the lowest levels of flood protection of any U.S. city its size. The area of risk covers more than 100,000 acres with 160,000 homes and structures, 400,000 residents, and more than $37 billion in developed property.

    Located at the confluence of the American and the Sacramento Rivers, a large part of the Sacramento area is threatened by flooding. Inflows from the February 1986 storms to Folsom Reservoir resulted in release of 134,000 cubic feet per second as compared to a safe channel capacity of 115,000 cfs. If rains in the American River watershed continued, levee failure could have occurred causing billions of dollars in damage. The January 1997 flood resulted in the largest recorded peak inflow to Folsom Dam but, because of Folsom Reservoir reoperation, the releases were kept to 115,000 cfs.

    The updated hydrologic statistics show that the existing flood control system provides the area with a level of protection equal to about 1 in 77 in any year. The risk of a storm that would overwhelm the existing levee system is about 30 percent in a 30-year period. With the completion of the authorized Common Elements Project (slurry walls in American River levees), the level of protection will increase slightly to about 1 in 81 in any year.

    Key activities/issues

    • On March 9, 1998, the Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency’s board declared its intent to support the Folsom Dam and Levee Modification Plan (Stepped Release Plan).

    • On March 20, 1998, The Reclamation Board approved Resolution No. 98-04 which supports SAFCA’s Folsom Dam Modification Plan and supports further technical studies with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and SAFCA that will lead to alternatives to provide Sacramento greater than 1-in-200 level of flood protection.

    • In the summer of 1998, the Corps worked with Congressmen Robert Matsui and John Doolittle to develop alternative plans for further consideration. The proposed Water Resources Development Act of 1998 was not passed by Congress.

    The three alternative plans under consideration by the Assistant Secretary of the Army and congressional representatives for the Water Resources Development Act of 1998 were:

    • Levee Modification Plan (Stepped Release Plan) - Raise and strengthen the lower American River levees and modify the Sacramento Weir and Bypass and Yolo Bypass to allow the American River and Sacramento and Yolo Bypasses to carry higher flows. Also included Folsom Dam modifications. Proposal reduced the flood risk to about 1 in 145.

    • Plan to Raise Folsom Dam and Auxiliary Dams - Raise Folsom Dam and auxiliary dams about 6.5 feet by construction of concrete parapet walls. Also included Folsom Dam modifications. Proposal reduced the flood risk to about 1 in 150.

    • American River Cofferdam Plan - Reconstruct a permanent cofferdam on the North Fork American River near Auburn. Also included Folsom Dam modifications. Proposal reduced the flood risk to about 1 in 160.

    Hamilton City, California, Feasibility Study

    Background

    This Study will identify alternatives to increase the level of flood protection for Hamilton City and determine the federal interest based upon costs, benefits, environmental effects, and local interest and support. The Study will focus on the feasibility of improving the "J" levee, which protects Hamilton City and construction of a setback levee. An environmental impact study/environmental impact report will also be prepared.

    Key activities/issues

    • On June 19, 1998 - the Board approved a letter of intent to the Corps to become the nonfederal Study sponsor. Staff met with Hamilton City Community Services District and Glenn County representatives to coordinate funding and negotiate the Feasibility Cost-Sharing Agreement, the Local Feasibility Cost-Sharing Agreement, and the Project Study Plan.

    The local sponsor is willing to provide the entire nonfederal share of the study costs (50 percent) to begin the Study and be reimbursed later by the State for 25 percent of the total study costs. Although the Board supports the feasibility study, it cannot make a financial commitment until funding has been approved by the Legislature. If funding were approved, the earliest it would be available is July 1999. The local sponsor is aware of these circumstances and is willing to provide the nonfederal share of funding whether and until State appropriations are available.

    Magpie Creek Section 205 Small Flood Control Project

    Background

    The Project consists of widening the existing Magpie Creek diversion channel to a 65-foot-base-width, trapezoidal channel with 2 horizontal and 1 vertical side slope from Magpie Creek diversion channel/Robla Creek confluence upstream to Raley Boulevard, and constructing 6,250 linear feet of levees with an average height of 5 feet. The Corps is scheduled to complete the plans and specifications by spring 1999. The Project is located immediately downstream of the decommissioned McClellan Air Force Base.

    Key activities/issues

    The Department of Water Resources sent a letter to SAFCA on March 13, 1996 stating that there were four issues that must be resolved prior to final State project approval.

    These four issues are:

    • The final project must function as intended without completion of a project on the decommissioned McClellan Air Force Base.

    • Assurances must be obtained from a nonstate entity (e.g., U.S. Air Force) stating it will be responsible for all project activities, costs, and liabilities resulting from materials or contaminates originating from the Base.

    • Assurances must be obtained that the most cost-effective mitigation alternative is proposed.

    • An agreement establishing appropriate local sponsorship must be executed.

    The Board sent letters to the Corps on March 19, 1996; July 2, 1996; and March 5, 1997 stating that the Board would be nonfederal sponsor of the Project contingent upon the following:

    • State project authorization

    • Appropriations from the State Legislature

    • Execution of an agreement establishing appropriate local sponsorship

    • Satisfactory resolution of the remaining Project Cooperation Agreement issues

    The four issues in the Department’s letter to SAFCA and included by reference in the Board’s letter to the Corps are being resolved. In 1998, the only issue that remained unresolved was obtaining assurances that a nonstate entity will be responsible for all project activities, costs, and liabilities resulting from materials or contaminates originating from the Base.

    Merced County Streams Group, Bear Creek Unit

    Background

    The Project’s purpose is to increase the level of flood protection from a 1-in-50-year event to a level appropriate for the Merced urban area.

    The Merced County Streams Group Project is a single-purpose flood control project developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on the foothill streams of Merced County. The Project was modified to concentrate on the flood protection for the Cities of Merced and Atwater and associated urban areas. The Project has two phases. The first phase, Castle Dam Unit, is nearing completion.

    The second phase, Bear Creek Unit, has three components:

    • Haystack Dam (a dry dam) on Black Rascal Creek.

    • Enlargement of Bear Dam (a dry dam) on Bear Creek.

    • Channel improvements on Fahrens Creek and Bear Creek. Mitigation is expected to be substantial because vernal pools were identified in the reservoir sites and borrow areas.

    Key activities/issues

    The Corps extended the final plan formulation identification for many years. After the March 1998 flood in Merced, Merced County was anxious for the Corps to reach a conclusion. The local sponsor is considering local flood control work that could change the plan and potentially cause further delay in project development. The recent FEMA certification of Merced Irrigation District's main canal could affect the Project’s plan formulation.

    Rock Creek/Keefer Slough Section 205 Feasibility Study

    Background

    In the past five years, the Rock Creek/Keefer Slough system has had recurring flooding. The majority of the flood damage affects single-family residences. Several developments in the last 60 years have caused the flooding to become more intense. These developments include leveling fields by landowners, increased private levees, and sedimentation in the system. This Study will evaluate structural and nonstructural alternatives for solving the flooding problems within the study area.

    Key activities/issues

    At the December 18, 1998 Reclamation Board meeting, the Board approved a letter of intent to be the nonfederal sponsor of the Rock Creek/Keefer Slough Feasibility Study. Staff will work with the Corps and the locals to draft a Local Feasibility Cost-Sharing Agreement and a Feasibility Cost-Sharing Agreement. Staff will request Board approval of the LFCSA and FCSA in spring 1999.

    Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basins Comprehensive Study

    Background

    In response to the floods of 1997 in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins, the Legislature and Congress approved and appropriated funding to initiate a comprehensive flood management study with emphasis on flood damage reduction and associated environmental restoration. This comprehensive study, recommended in the Governor’s Flood Emergency Action Team Report, was initiated in February 1998 with the signing of a feasibility cost-sharing agreement by the Corps and the Board to cost share 50/50 in the comprehensive study. This four-year study is to be completed in two phases. An interim report consisting of a framework plan, postflood assessment report, and status report on the hydrologic and hydraulic modeling efforts is to be completed in the spring of 1999. The second phase will conclude with a master strategy for flood system management accompanied by programmatic NEPA/CEQA documents.

    Key activities/issues

    • Resolution No. 97-17, approved by the Board at its meeting on December 19, 1997, delegated to the General Manager authority to execute the Feasibility Cost-Sharing Agreement and Project Study Plan. The Feasibility Cost-Sharing Agreement for $16 million of the study cost has been executed between the Corps and the Board effective February 1, 1998. A revised FCSA will be forthcoming during Phase II to authorize cost sharing the remaining project cost (the study cost is estimated at $22 million).

    • The need to revise the total study cost became evident due to the need for topographic mapping of overflow areas along the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers to assess the potential structural and nonstructural projects and impacts of failure-induced flooding. State funds ($2.75 million) needed to support this requirement for mapping generated by aerial photography and use of laser technology are requested in fiscal year 1999-2000 as part of a total fiscal year 1999-2000 request of $5.65 million.

    • Policy issues that would impact the development of a comprehensive strategy for management of the flood control system are beginning to surface. As issues are formulated during Phase II, it is expected that the Board will be requested to consider providing direction to issues so that a comprehensive management strategy can be formulated.

    South Sacramento Streams Project

    Background


    This Project includes levee and channel improvements on Morrison Creek and its major tributaries (Elder, Florin, Unionhouse, and Laguna Creeks) and, in the lower basin, the Beach Lake levees which protect the Meadowview and Pocket areas of Sacramento and the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    The major project features are:

    • Constructing 12.6 miles of floodwalls

    • Raising 4.6 miles of existing levees

    • Constructing 1.3 miles of new levees

    • Installing 7.7 miles of sheet-pile cutoff walls in existing levees

    • Retrofitting 17 bridges

    • Removing one bridge

    There has been no Board action on this Project although an information briefing was presented to the Board by SAFCA and the Corps at the Board's July 17, 1998 regular meeting. This Project is awaiting federal authorization in 1999.

    Key activities/issues

    • Residents and landowners in the downstream Beach-Stone Lakes and North Delta have expressed concern about potential adverse hydraulic impacts.

    • SAFCA has stated its intention to provide $2 million for hydraulic mitigation. SAFCA's board has not made a commitment to this fund or how it will be used.

    • The North Delta interests in San Joaquin County have requested that the hydraulic impacts of upstream projects/developments including the South Sacramento County Streams Project, be alleviated in conjunction with this project.

    • There is an alleged Endangered Species Act violation that SAFCA must resolve to ensure that Board sponsorship does not involve ESA liability.

    • There is a requirement that the nonfederal sponsor be responsible that project condition flows do not exceed preproject condition flows up to the 100-year flood event. A joint Project Cooperation Agreement with SAFCA may be necessary to preclude the Board from assuming this local planning responsibility. Board staff concerns have been discussed with about potential hydraulic impacts in the North Delta.

    Tehama Section 205 Feasibility Study

    Background

    Structural and nonstructural alternatives were evaluated in prior studies. The nonfederal sponsor rejected the structural alternative of a ring levee because it was too costly to maintain. An alternative is the nonstructural alternative of raising homes above the 100-year floodplain. Raising the homes within a major portion of a city would be the first Corps-sponsored project in the nation. An environmental impact report/environmental impact study will be prepared.

    Key activities/issues

    • On July 18, 1998, the Board signed a letter of intent to become the nonfederal Study sponsor. Board staff began meeting with Corps staff and Tehama representatives to coordinate funding and negotiate the FCSA, LFCSA, and the Project Study Plan.

    • The local sponsor is willing to provide the entire nonfederal share of the Study costs (50 percent) to begin the Study and be reimbursed later by the State for 25 percent of the total study costs. The Board supports the Study but is unable to make a financial commitment until funding is approved by the Legislature. If funding were approved, funds would be available July 1999. The local sponsor is aware of these circumstances.

    Terminus Dam, Lake Kaweah Flood Control Project

    Background

    The Corps constructed Terminus Dam in 1962 for flood protection and water supply. The Project was constructed for 150,000 acre-feet of storage, with 142,000 acre-feet authorized for flood control and 8,000 acre-feet for sedimentation.

    This Project will raise Terminus Dam spillway by 21 feet to increase the flood storage space of Lake Kaweah by 42,600 acre-feet. The preferred alternative is a French spillway design (Hydroplus International) which is a series of tipping concrete fuse-gate structures.

    Key activities/issues

    On January 16, 1998, the Board approved a letter to the Corps expressing the Board’s intent to become the nonfederal sponsor of the Project.

    DWR’s Division of Safety of Dams has expressed safety concerns about the fuse-gate spillway design (spillway flow surge and dependability). DSOD will review and comment on the fuse-gate design and on the hydraulic and seismic stability modeling which were initiated in late 1998. Other issues of concern include whether the Corps or the nonfederal sponsor holds title to the additional real property acquired around the perimeter of the reservoir for this Project and whether the Corps continues to operate and maintain the entire project. Current federal policy is for the nonfederal sponsor to hold title to real property and to operate and maintain new projects; however, the Corps holds title to the real property for the existing project and operates and maintains the existing project. The Corps is being asked to assume title to property acquired for this project and to operate and maintain the entire project with the Corps to be reimbursed from the nonfederal sponsor for that portion of operation and maintenance costs necessitated by this project.

    Board staff met with the Corps and Kaweah Delta Water Conservation District staff to discuss issues about the fuse-gate spillway design and with the Department of Transportation to discuss the highway and bridge relocations necessitated by this project. Staff also participated in the value engineering workshop conducted by the Corps. In 1998, KDWCD, the local cost-sharing partner, acquired, at a cost of $2 million, 5,000 acres of oak forest land to be used to satisfy some of the environmental mitigation requirements of the Project.

    West Stanislaus County Storm Drainage Project Feasibility Study

    Background

    The Project’s purpose is to evaluate federal and State interests for increasing the level of flood protection from a 1-in-4-year event to a 1-in-100-year event for the Cities of Newman and Patterson.

    The study area consists of two adjacent watersheds: Orestimba and Salado Creeks. Both watersheds originate in the Diablo Range in West Stanislaus County and flow east to the San Joaquin River.

    Key activities/issues

    The Board approved a letter of intent to be the nonfederal sponsor of the Study on December 18, 1998.

    Funding, if approved by the Legislature, would be available in July 2000. The local sponsor is willing to provide the full nonfederal share of funding for the study in the interim.

    Yuba River Basin Project

    Background

    The Project’s purpose is to increase the level of flood protection from a 1-in-63-year event to a 1-in-200-year event in the Linda/Olivehurst area, from a 1-in-111-year event to a 1-in-200-year event in the Arboga area, and from a 1-in-114-year event to a 1-in-300-year event in the Marysville area.

    Project components consist of:

    • Reach 1: construction of 3.7 miles of new slurry wall, deepening 2.5 miles of slurry wall, construction of 1.4 miles of new berm, raising 1.2 miles of levee, and modification of 4.5 miles of berm and drain

    • Reach 2: deepening of 0.5 mile of slurry wall, construction of 0.5 mile of new berm, and modification of 3 miles of berm and drain

    • Reach 3: construction of 5.1 miles of new slurry wall and berm along the ring levee surrounding the City of Marysville

    • The slurry wall deepening has already been performed as advanced work under Section 104 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986.

    Key activities/issues

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report was completed in April 1998. The Notice of Determination was filed on July 24, 1998.

    On July 17, 1998, the Board adopted Resolution No. 98-14 to:

    • Certify the Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental lmpact Report

    • Adopt Findings

    • Adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations

    • Adopt mitigation measures

    • Adopt the Mitigation Monitoring Plan

    • Delegate to the General Manager the authority to complete negotiations of and sign a Preconstruction Engineering and Design Agreement with the Corps and a Local Preconstruction Engineering and Design Agreement with Yuba County Water Agency.

    The Corps requested that the Project be authorized in WRDA 1999, and the local beneficiaries will be seeking State authorization for the Board.

    American River Watershed (Natomas Features) Project

    Background


    The proposed project consists of:

    • Raising the north and south levees of Arcade Creek.

    • Constructing a new levee along the north bank of Dry Creek.

    • Raising and constructing new levee along the south banks of Dry and Robla Creeks.

    • Retaining and reinforcing the low points along the west levee of the Pleasant Grove Creek Canal.

    • Raising the south levee of the Natomas Cross Canal.

    • Constructing a pump structure on Natomas East Main Drainage Canal.

    • Raising the west and east levees of the Natomas East Main Drainage Canal.

    Key activities/issues


    SAFCA has essentially completed construction of the Project under Board encroachment permits. The Corps and SAFCA are working to finalize a Memorandum of Agreement among the Department of the Army, State of California, and SAFCA for reimbursement for the federally authorized features of the north area local project and operation and maintenance of the federal project features.

    Board staff began discussions with the parties to resolve the issues and develop the agreements. SAFCA is continuing to pursue authorization (Senate Bill 257) for State reimbursement of the north area project.

    American River Watershed Project (Common Features)

    Background

    The proposed project consists of:

    • Constructing approximately 20 miles of slurry wall in the existing levees along both banks of the Lower American River.

    • Strengthening and raising approximately 12 miles of existing levee and berm along the east side of the Sacramento River.

    • Modifying the existing flood-warning system for the Lower American River.

    • Installing three telemetered streamflow gages upstream of Folsom Dam.

    Key activities/issues

    On May 15, 1998, the Board approved Resolution No. 98-09, which certified the Final EIR for the Common Features of the American River Watershed Project, adopted its findings based on that final EIR, and approved the Common Features Project. The Board approved Resolution No. 98-10, delegating authority to the General Manager to complete negotiations and sign the Local Project Cooperation Agreement and the Project Cooperation Agreement for the Common Features Project. The Notice of Determination was filed on May 18, 1998.

    On June 19, the Board approved Resolution No. 98-16 certifying the Supplemental EIR for the American River Watershed (Common Features) Project-North Bank Slurry Wall and adopted findings based on the Supplemental EIR.

    Staff continued negotiations with the Corps and SAFCA to finalize the required cooperation agreements. Negotiations concluded in July when the Board entered into a LPCA and a Project Cooperation Agreement with SAFCA and the Corps.

    Construction was initiated in July and completed November 30, 1998 on the right bank levee slurry wall from Howe Avenue to Watt Avenue. Throughout 1998, final design and right-of-way activities continued for the remaining construction contracts. On the remaining right bank levee slurry wall work, restrictive rights of way and limited staging areas are issues, especially around Cal Expo and the Campus Commons Golf Course.

    Along the left bank levee, a large number of private landside levee encroachments exist, such as stairs, irrigation systems, and fences along the landside toe. Restrictive right of way, limited staging areas, and access points are issues.

    The telemetered streamflow gages were installed by SAFCA in late fall/early winter 1997, prior to the Corps receiving federal appropriations for the Project. SAFCA will receive credit for the advanced funds toward its share of the project cost.

    Staff reviewed preliminary plans and specifications for modifications to the flood-warning system and provided comments to the Corps. Progress on this part of the Project has been slow because efforts have been concentrated on the slurry walls and levee- and berm-raising contracts.

    The City of Sacramento has requested the Corps to assist with the construction of an outfall, which runs through California State University Sacramento to the American River. Work has been proposed using the slurry wall contractor. This work and work scheduled on the Natomas Cross Canal for SAFCA are proposed as betterments and will be funded by the City and SAFCA. With the Sacramento River levee- and berm-raising portion, restrictive rights of way, limited staging areas, and lack of access points are problems. Homeowners along Garden Highway (on the water side of the levee) have concerns about impacts on their properties and access to their properties. The construction schedule may be restricted (August 1-November 15) to avoid disrupting Swainson’s hawks and giant garter snakes.

    All jet grouting will be completed under a separate contract, which may start before the completion of the other contracts. The Corps believes that a soil-bentonite slurry wall produces a more effective and less expensive solution to the levee stability concerns and proposes eliminating cement from the slurry wall mix. The Board believes using cement in the slurry wall mix is necessary.

    Cache Creek Settling Basin

    Background


    The Settling Basin was constructed in 1937 to maintain the floodflow capacity of the Yolo Bypass by controlling sediment deposition. The Basin consists of approximately 11 miles of levee encompassing about 3,500 acres. In March 1990, the Department of the Army and the State signed an agreement for the CCSB Enlargement Project. The Project was essentially completed in 1993.

    Since the project modification was completed, low flows out of CCSB have caused impacts that did not occur before project construction. The Corps agreed to mitigate the impacts associated with the outflow of CCSB.

    Potential future work includes:

    • Constructing a diversion structure across the Yolo Bypass to convey the low flows north of the Yolo Shortline Railroad's trestle to the Tule Canal.

    • Raising the reconstructed weir by an additional 6 feet by 2018.

    • Installing low-flow diversion culvert(s) through the training levee to divert the incoming summer flows, allowing Department of Water Resources' maintenance personnel to safely preserve the integrity and capacity of the training channel.

    • Mitigating for project impacts, if any, to City of Woodland's stormwater drainage system.

    Key activities/issues

    In July, the State sent a letter requesting the Corps to resume design activities. The Corps is evaluating its own proposed structure, the study group's preferred alternative, and other potential alternatives.

    Staff has met with local interests and the Corps to resolve the remaining issues of this project on several occasions. Staff and the Corps discussed several alternatives to resolve the Yolo Shortline Railroad's trestle soil erosion issue in the Yolo Bypass. These alternatives include constructing a berm north of the trestle, installing culverts through the weir, and performing soil modifications to the area surrounding the railroad trestle and placing riprap around the piers for additional protection. To date, the Corps and the State, with the local interests, have not agreed on any alternatives.

    Staff has developed an approach to resolve the issues regarding any project impact to the City of Woodland. The State requested the Corps to perform an impact analysis to identify impacts to the City of Woodland's storm drainage system. The analysis will determine the impacts to the City, if any, and propose mitigation measures. The State and the Corps intend to resolve this issue before the next flood season in November 1999.

    The Project is nearing the Corps' Section 902 limit (maximum allowable project cost). If the cost of the remaining work exceeds that limit, the Corps will be required to obtain a postauthorization change from Congress, which takes a minimum of six months. Also, maintenance of the City of Woodland's discharge channel outfall structure and the old south levee are issues that need to be resolved.

    Construction

    Eastside Bypass Levee Raising

    Background

    This project will restore the flood-carrying capacity of the Eastside Bypass between West Washington Road and Sandy Mush Road. DWR’s Division of Engineering is producing plans and specifications for this project with the Division of Flood Management and the Lower San Joaquin Levee District. This project is scheduled for completion by November 1, 1999.

    Key activities/issues

    Board staff has met with the Lower San Joaquin Levee District and toured the project area. Original as-built drawings will be used to help determine the true settlement of the right and left bank levees relative to the regional survey elevation network. DOE geologists will obtain foundation borings to identify any additional subsidence mechanisms besides groundwater extraction. DOE is conducting environmental surveys and is producing a project schedule and cost estimate. LSJLD has submitted data identifying pipe, culvert, and utility locations, which encroach upon the levees.

    Merced County Streams Group, Castle Dam Unit

    Background


    The project purpose is to increase flood protection from a 1-in-50-year level to a level appropriate for the Merced urban area. Castle Dam is a single-purpose flood control (dry) dam. It has a capacity of 6,400 acre-feet and is on Canal Creek, a tributary of Bear Creek. Prior to its construction, the Merced Irrigation District's Main Canal captured the flows of the upstream creeks. This runoff is conveyed in the Main Canal, which crosses above the City of Merced before reaching Lake Yosemite. A diversion structure has been constructed across the Main Canal and the turnouts from the Canal rediverted floodflows downstream and into Castle Dam. The dam, diversion structure, and enlargement of the turnout structures are complete. High flows in March 1998 caused damage to some of the completed construction. Repairs have been made. More work needs to be completed on Edendale Creek, such as rock protection, replacement of the Oakdale Bridge, and finalization of the real estate acquisition.

    Key activities/issues

    The Corps has not completed the acquisition of real estate or transferred all of the property rights to the State.

    The Corps' contract for Edendale Creek has had cost overruns; some are in dispute. These activities could cost the State more than the available funds. The Corps has not estimated the increased costs.

    1997 Cost-Shared Public Law 84-99

    Background

    This special federally authorized program began in December 1997 and provides cost-shared repairs under the authority of PL 84-99 to Central Valley levees that protect urban areas or critical infrastructure.

    The proposed repairs are for seepage problems and other damage not considered eligible under the Corps' regular PL 84-99 program. The program is cost shared 75/25, federal/nonfederal, under the cost-sharing provisions of WRDA 1986. Nonfederal costs are shared according to the 70/30 State/local cost-sharing formula for federal flood control projects in State Water Code Section 12585.5.

    Work is proposed under this program for SAC 10 (Sacramento Bypass), SAC 16 (Marysville Levee District), SAC 18 (LD 1 Sutter, LD 9 Sutter, MA 3 Sutter Bypass, and Wadsworth Canal), SJ 3 (RD 404), and SJ 4 (RD 17).

    Key activities/issues

    In November 1998, construction began on the Feather River setback levee at Shanghai Bend in SAC 18 (LD 1 Sutter). The contract was awarded to the Clear Water Construction Company of Alaska. The levee has been excavated and prepared for placement of levee fill, which will start in the spring of 1999. An inspection trench, 6 feet deep, has been excavated. Undesirable topsoil and sand have been removed from the Starbend borrow site, exposing the underlying clay soil which will be used for levee fill.

    The Corps will award a contract for rehabilitation of the south levee of the Sacramento Bypass (SAC 10). Inclement weather delayed construction until the spring of 1999; therefore, this construction will be combined into one contract with the West Sacramento Project.

    PCAs and LPCAs are being prepared for SAC 16 and 18, and SJ 3 and 4. Concurrently, rights of way, easements, and borrow material are being obtained so construction can begin in the spring of 1999 for the remaining locations.

    PL 84-99 Rehabilitation of 1997 Flood Damage

    Background


    The January and March 1997 floods caused extensive levee damage to the Sacramento River Flood Control Project and the San Joaquin River flood control system. Under PL 84-99, the Corps performed repair work to the federal projects.

    Key activities/issues

    Some repairs did not perform well in the 1998 floods and required additional work under the 1997 rehabilitation program. Repair sites found to have inadequate margins of safety for seepage control, bank or erosion protection, or slope stability are:

    • Bank erosion in RD 1001 (being repaired by the Corps)

    • Breach "F" on RD 2075

    • Tisdale levee slumping and seepage distress in RD 1500

    • Wave-wash erosion and slumping in RD 2068

    • Seepage distress in RD 2101

    • Sealing slide cracks at Levee Mile 3.48 in RD 2060

    Some 1997 repairs were deferred until the 1998 construction season. The 1997 program is continuing to finish all projects. Of the original 602 repair projects, 588 have been completed, 9 need additional work, and 5 require final inspection.

    In 1998, Board staff and the Corps conducted site evaluations to determine mitigation requirements for these repairs. Initial estimates by the Corps suggest that 70,000 linear feet of shaded riverine aquatic habitat will be required.

    PL 84-99 Rehabilitation of 1998 Flood Damage

    Background

    The February 1998 floods caused extensive levee damage to the Sacramento River Flood Control Project and the San Joaquin River flood control system. This damage will be repaired by the Corps under the PL 84-99 program.

    Key activities/issues

    The Board coordinated 68 requests for assistance from local agencies under this program and processed all of these requests to the Corps. The Corps declared 1 request ineligible and the remaining 67 were accepted for PL 84-99 rehabilitation assistance. Critical repairs are complete at RD 537, RD 501, LD 1 (Sutter County), and Knights Landing Ridge Cut Drainage District.

    Sacramento River Bank Protection Project

    Background

    The project purpose is to preserve the integrity of the Sacramento River Flood Control Project levee system by protecting its banks from erosion.

    Key activities/issues

    • Contract 42E

      Nine critical erosion sites were identified for bank protection in 1999. The work will likely consist of reshaping the waterside levee slope and riverbank and placing rock revetment on the riverbank.

      The Final Environmental Impact Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement IV, Sacramento River Bank Protection Project, was completed in December 1987. An Environmental Assessment/Initial Study will be done as a supplemental document to evaluate impacts on each site.

    • Lower American River

      Three bank protection sites along the American River were under construction in 1998:

      • Site 1 is 2,575 feet long and on the left bank at River Mile 2.11. The upstream portion will be constructed with a rock fill slope that can be planted. The middle and downstream portions will have a scalloped low berm covered with cobble on the middle portion and covered with a geotechnical fabric at the downstream end.

      • Site 2 is 656 feet long and on the left bank at River Mile 3.75. The site will be constructed with a scalloped cobble low berm and a rocked slope.

      • Site 3 is 3,600 feet long and on the left bank at River Mile 4.4. The site was constructed with a scalloped and undulating low berm composed of a rock prism covered with fabric-encapsulated soil.

      • Two sites are planned for construction in 1999. Site 4 is 3,100 feet long and on the left bank at River Mile 6.8. A straight cobble low berm will be constructed and the existing cobble on the levee slope will be repaired. Site 5 is 1,200 feet long and on the right bank at River Mile 8.7. A rocked low berm with a soil trench for planting will be constructed to stop toe scour. Mitigation would be done both on- and off-site. The upper slope stability will be addressed in follow-on construction in late 1999.

      The environmental document for Sites 1, 2, and 4, Streambank Protection for the Lower American River, Final Environmental Impact Report and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement V for the Sacramento River Bank Protection Project, was completed in March 1998. The environmental document for Site 5, Streambank Protection for Site 5 on the Lower American River, Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Study, was completed on November 12, 1998. The Notice of Determination and Finding of No Significant Impact were filed on November 13, 1998.

      On April 17, 1998, the Board took the following action:

      • Certified the Programmatic/Site Specific Environmental Impact Report for Streambank Protection on the Lower American River Sites 1, 2, and 4, Sacramento River Bank Protection Project, March 1998.

      • Adopted the Biological Resources Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Plan for Sites 1, 2, and 4 and the Project Maintenance Agreement between The Reclamation Board and Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency for the Sacramento River Bank Protection Project - Lower American River.

      • Approved the Sacramento River Bank Protection Project - Lower American River Sites 1, 2, and 4.

      On May 15, 1998, the Board adopted Resolution No. 98-08 for Sites 1, 2, 3, and 4 to:

      • Approve in concept the Operation and Maintenance Agreement between the Board and SAFCA for the Sacramento River Bank Protection Project on the Lower American River.

      • Delegate to the General Manager authority to complete negotiation of the Agreement with SAFCA.

      • Delegate to the General Manager authority to sign said Agreement. The Operation and Maintenance Agreement was executed on August 4, 1998.

      On October 16, 1998, the Board adopted Resolution No. 98-24 to:

      • Delegate to the General Manager authority to adopt Mitigated Negative Declaration and Mitigation Monitoring Plan and file a Notice of Determination for bank protection work at Site 5.

      • Delegate to the General Manager the authority to approve construction of a bank protection project at Site 5.

      • Delegate to the General Manager the authority to complete negotiations of and sign an Operation and Maintenance Agreement between The Reclamation Board, American River Flood Control District, and SAFCA for Site 5.

      • Delegate to the General Manager authority to complete negotiations of and sign a Mitigation Agreement between The Reclamation Board and SAFCA for Site 5.

      On November 6, 1998, the Mitigated Negative Declaration and Mitigation Monitoring Plan for Site 5 were adopted by the Board. A Notice of Determination was filed.

      On November 16, 1998, the Operation and Maintenance Agreement with American River Flood Control District and SAFCA for Site 5 was executed by the Board.

    Sacramento River Flood Control System Evaluation

    Background

    The purpose of the system evaluation and levee reconstruction is to return deficient levee sections to original design standards. The evaluation was initiated after the severe flood conditions in 1983 and 1986 revealed reaches of levees that are structurally deficient and incapable of safely conveying design floodflows. Engineering studies and investigations conducted to evaluate the integrity and level of flood protection provided by these levees show that reconstruction of the levees or other methods of stabilizing the levees is necessary.

    Key activities/issues

    The work is divided geographically into five phases. Phase 1, the Sacramento Urban Area Levee Reconstruction Project, was completed in 1996.

    • Marysville/Yuba City Area Levee Reconstruction Project (Phase II)

      The Project involves levee reconstruction at 13 sites. Repair measures vary for each site, which may be slurry wall in the crown of the levee or at the waterside toe of the levee, gravel drain and berm on the landside of the levee, levee raising, or relocation of the irrigation ditch away from the levee toe.

      Construction continued in late 1998; the work at 13 sites has been completed. Miscellaneous construction items will be accomplished under a special contract for 1999. The mitigation contract is nearly complete. As the Corps completes the Operation and Maintenance Manuals, the work will be transferred from the Corps through the Board to the local maintaining agencies.

      On May 15, 1998, the Board delegated authority to the General Manger to execute amendments to the Project Cooperation Agreement and Local Project Cooperation Agreement for increased costs and investigation of new sites. On September 13, 1998, the Board accepted and transferred work for Contract Area 1.

    • Mid-Valley Area Levee Reconstruction Project (Phase III)

      Approximately 18.3 miles of levees will be reconstructed by raising levee heights and constructing slurry walls, stability berms, and seepage blankets. The Project consists of:

      • Contract 1A: at the right bank of the Sutter Bypass within Reclamation District 1500 from Levee Mile 13.75 to LM 14.75, construct 5,300 feet of stability berm.

      • Contract 1B: at seven sites within RD 1500, reconstruct 6 miles of levee with toe drains, stability berms, or slope stabilization.

      • Contract 1C: mitigation contract for the work done in RD 1500.

      • Contract 1D: modifies the work done under Contract 1A by constructing 6,000 feet of slurry wall.

      • Contract 2: at 13 sites within RDs 1600, 1001, 827, and 785; Knights Landing Ridge Drainage District; and Yolo County, reconstruct 12 miles of levee with toe drains, stability berms, slope stabilization, and slurry walls.

      Contract 1A was completed in 1997. Contract 1B was completed this year. Contract 2 is scheduled to begin in September 1999 and continue until December 2000.

      Water levels in the Sutter Bypass were high during early 1998. At the 1997 construction Sites 1 and 2 in RD 1500 Contract 1A, new seepage boils had developed. Boils also developed in Sites 2-1 through 2-10, the next construction sites of this contract. In 1998, a special levee review group studied Sites 1, 2, and 2-1 through 2-10 and recommended modifications to the current design. The levee review group will meet in mid-January 1999 and review the Corps' recommendation to construct slurry walls at Sites 1 and 2. The Corps' recommended modifications to Sites 2-1 through 2-10 requires a six- to eight-week dewatering of Sutter Mutual Water Company's irrigation canal. The only opportunity for dewatering occurs around October in some years.

    • Lower Sacramento Area Levee Reconstruction Project (Phase IV)

      The Project consists of:

      • Site 1: placing 4,040 feet of stability berm and 5,300 feet of slurry wall in the center of levee on RD 3 (Grand Island).

      • Site 2: raising 1,936 linear feet of levee crown along Miner Slough on RD 999 (Big Area).

      • Site 3: backfilling 2,311 feet of landside ditches along Elk Slough on RD 150 (Merritt Island).

      • Site 4: backfilling a ditch and placing 1,652 feet of stability berm at southern tip of RD 349 (Sutter Island).

      • Site 5: placing 5,700 feet of seepage/stability berm at three sites on RD 501 (Ryer Island).

      Board staff reviewed plans and specifications prepared by the Corps and negotiated four Project Cooperation Agreements--one for each participating reclamation district, as well as Local Project Cooperation Agreements with the local sponsors. Right of way staff began appraisals for negotiating the permanent and temporary easements required for construction.

      The Corps evaluated 295 miles of Sacramento River Flood Control Project levees in the lower Sacramento area and identified 47 miles of levees requiring reconstruction work to meet project design requirements. An incremental feasibility analysis found only 2.6 miles of levee reconstruction for which there is a federal interest. The Governor’s Flood Emergency Action Team recommended the reevaluation and repair of all sites, including the infeasible sites. Staff is developing an issue paper to initiate approval for the infeasible sites. (The recent addition of the Ryer Island site was the result of a reevaluation of the incremental benefit/cost ratio for only that segment of the project, not a systemwide reevaluation.)

    • Upper Sacramento Area Levee Reconstruction Project (Phase V)

      The Project includes the following:

      • Site D: construct 3,038 feet of stability berm.

      • Site E: construct 8,155 feet of stability berm and 8,845 feet of slurry wall.

      Board staff reviewed plans and specifications prepared by the Corps and negotiated the Project Cooperation Agreement with the Corps and the Local Project Cooperation Agreement with the local sponsor. Right of way staff began negotiating the permanent and temporary easements required for construction.

      The Corps evaluated 309 miles of Sacramento River Flood Control Project levees in the upper Sacramento area and identified 12.4 miles of levees requiring reconstruction work to meet project design requirements. An incremental feasibility analysis found 3.7 miles of levee reconstruction for which there is a federal interest. The Governor’s Flood Emergency Action Team recommended the reevaluation and repair of all sites, including the infeasible sites. Staff is developing an issue paper to initiate approval for the infeasible sites.

    • Phase VI

      Authority to investigate new sites in the areas covered under Phases II
      through V was approved by the Corps. Due to the 1995 and 1997 floods, portions of levees may still require reconstruction. In order to "close the books" on Phases II through V, the Corps will include all new sites under Phase VI. Work was initiated by the Corps to investigate the need for levee reconstruction in RD 784 at a site on the east side of the Feather River between Starbend and Bear River. A second request to the local districts for levee reconstruction at other sites will be made in early 1999.

    West Sacramento Project

    Background


    This Project will raise and strengthen about 5 miles of existing levees by a maximum of 5 feet on the east side of the Yolo Bypass and the south side of the Sacramento Bypass. The Project includes relocation of utilities and the development of a wetland/marshland environmental restoration site contiguous to the Sacramento Deepwater Ship Channel.

    Key activities/issues

    The first construction contract that raised the east levee of the Yolo Bypass (Reach A and Reach B) was completed this year. Development of the environmental restoration site began this year and the site will be planted in spring 1999. A contract will be awarded in 1999 to complete the levee raising of the east levee of the Yolo Bypass (Reach C) and the south levee of the Sacramento Bypass (Reach D). Due to the levee slumping in Reach C during February 1998 high water, the Corps is reevaluating its proposed design for this reach. The cost-shared PL 84-99 work needed to restore the Sacramento Bypass levee (Reach D) to its preflood condition will be included in the levee restoration contract.

    Environmental

    Middle Creek Ecosystem Restoration Study

    Background

    This Study will evaluate degrading of the existing substandard flood control levees and constructing flow-regulating structures to recreate a diverse mosaic of vegetation and wetlands that provide open water and riparian habitat for fish and wildlife including special-status species and allow the area to be flooded during high stages. The wetlands created also will improve the water quality of Clear Lake by trapping sediment and phosphorous.

    Key activities/issues

    On June 19, 1998, the Board approved a letter of intent to the Corps to become the nonfederal sponsor for the feasibility study and, at the November 20, 1998 regular meeting, approved Resolution No. 98-26 delegating to the General Manager authority to sign the FCSA and LFCSA.

    Lake County received $495,000 in Proposition 204 funds to pay for the nonfederal share of the feasibility study. Proposition 204 funds will become available to the local cost-sharing partner in 1999. The FCSA has not yet been signed. The Corps' Sacramento District has requested a two-month extension to the December 4, 1998 deadline for signing from its Headquarters office. The Sacramento District has been advised that the extension will be approved.

    Murphy Slough Habitat Restoration

    Background


    The project’s purpose is to restore riparian vegetation on approximately 300 acres of fallow land and 2,000 linear feet of riverbank and to protect the area from surface erosion (i.e., head cuts). In 1994, the Corps studied opportunities on the Sacramento River for restoration under Section 1135 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986. When no local environmental sponsor was found, the Board stepped forward as the environmental sponsor and offered to provide Board land for environmental restoration at the Murphy Slough site. The land value was sufficiently large so as to not require additional funding.

    The project will create 2,000 linear feet of shaded riverine aquatic cover on the existing bank of the Sacramento River by creating 1,200 feet of low berm and planting vegetation on it and by planting vegetation on 800 feet of the existing bank. Also, 17 acres of riparian forest, 26 acres of valley oak woodland, 50 acres of valley oak savanna (seedlings), and 77 acres of valley oak savanna (acorns) will be planted.

    Key activities/issues

    On April 17, 1998, the Board adopted the Initial Study and Negative Declaration for the Project and approved the Project contingent on a Safe Harbor Agreement between the Board and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    On July 17, 1998, the Board adopted Resolution No. 98-12 to:

    • Approve the project without contingencies.

    • Delegate to the General Manager the authority to complete the negotiation of a Project Cooperation Agreement with the Corps and to sign said agreement (PCA was signed in September 1998).

    • Delegate to the General Manager the authority to negotiate an agreement with USFWS to protect existing agricultural practices on adjacent private lands and to sign said agreement.

    There are concerns that USFWS may limit agricultural activities on adjacent private lands if the listed species using the new habitat migrate into those lands. The agreement between the Board and USFWS will address these concerns.

    North Fork Feather River Near Chester, Fish Passage Modification

    Background


    The project’s purpose is to improve fish migration through the North Fork Feather River diversion dam.

    The North Fork Feather River Project is a single-purpose flood control dam on the North Fork Feather River that diverts floodflows around the community of Chester into Lake Almanor. The dam was built in 1976 and is a Reclamation Board-sponsored project built by the Corps. A log boom for catching debris and a fish ladder were built into the Project but they have not functioned properly over the years. Part of the problem has been debris blocking the fish ladder.

    Key activities/issues

    The project consists of a major modification of the fish ladder and installation of a fixed shear boom to replace the log boom.

    Funds were received in late 1997 to allow resumption of construction of the project modifications. The large snowpack in the spring of 1998 prevented completion of all the work. The contract for the shear boom will be awarded early 1999. Debris will continue to be a problem until the shear boom is modified in 1999. The fish ladder is fully operational.

    Permits, Enforcements, Inspections, and Others

    Flood Project Inspection Section

    Background


    The Annual Flood Control Maintenance and Repair Report, the Environmental Report, and the Channel Report were completed and distributed. The Structure Report is in progress.

    Staff inspected 1,607 miles of project levees.

    Key activities/issues

    There were 90 construction starts and 59 have been completed. Also,
    1,200 miles of designated floodway have been inspected.

    In the inventory of illegal fences and barriers, there were 17 unauthorized encroachments still unresolved.

      Total encroachments found through December 1998 153
      Total encroachments resolved 105
      Total encroachments remaining 65

    Floodway Protection Section Encroachment Permits

    Background


    During 1998, the Board received 150 permit applications and issued 197 permits, including some revisions of preexisting permits. Approximately 48 minor variances were granted.

    Key activities/issues

    • Some of the more significant and/or controversial applications were:

      • No. 16567-B, San Joaquin Flood Control Agency, Bear Creek wing levee, City of Stockton.

        SJFCA proposed several enhancements to the existing Corps levee improvements to provide 100-year, FEMA-certifiable, flood protection for the Stockton urban area. One of these improvements included a wing levee that would protect downstream urban areas from accumulated local drainage and projected overflows from upstream reaches of Bear Creek.

        This project was protested by several landowners adjacent to the proposed wing levee. Following substantial hydrologic and hydraulic examination, the Board issued the Permit in June 1998.

      • No. 16804, San Joaquin Flood Control Agency, Upper Mosher Creek levee improvements, City of Stockton.

        SJFCA proposed several enhancements to the existing Corps levee improvements on Mosher Creek to provide 100-year, FEMA-certifiable, flood protection for the Stockton urban area. These improvements were subsequently determined to cause hydraulic impacts to upstream properties along Upper Mosher Creek. Board staff required hydraulic mitigation for the upstream reaches as a condition for approval of the downstream channel improvements. These hydraulic mitigations were protested by several adjacent landowners. Following hydrologic and hydraulic review and modifications to the O&M Manual, the Board granted the permit in June 1998.

      • No. 16835, Roseville Department of Public Works, urban flood improvements, Linda and Cirby Creeks, City of Roseville.

        To abate long-standing flood and drainage problems, the City of Roseville proposed numerous improvements to Linda and Cirby Creeks. These included conveyance enhancements, a flow bypass, and ancillary work such as bridge raising and culvert modifications. This project was protested by several landowners adjacent to proposed retaining walls and by numerous residents that were concerned with the potential loss of riparian oak trees. Following substantial hydrologic and hydraulic examination, the Board approved the permit in June 1998.

      • Five private owners, Maintenance Area 9, fence permit revisions Sacramento River, City of Sacramento.

        As of October 1997, Senate Bill 1068 added several sections to the California Water Code pertaining to fences on the water side of certain levees. Only fences that could be removed in segments as the river stage increases are permissible. This required the Board to abate or require the modification of five existing, noncompliant fences along the Sacramento River in Maintenance Area 9 of south Sacramento. This action was protested by the fence owners and by numerous area residents that were concerned with transients and security in the neighborhood. Following numerous informational meetings and negotiations, this matter is currently in litigation.

      • No. 16533, Meideros/Mohamed farm road and stream crossing, Deer Creek Designated Floodway, Sacramento County.

        Numerous residents of the adjacent subdivision that contains the roadway easement within the boundaries of many of the rear yards protested this permit application. The Board is the lead agency for the CEQA process. While numerous environmental questions have been raised, primary considerations seem to be traffic, noise, air quality, and compatibility with the neighborhood. Environmental documentation is currently in process.

    • Butte County and Glenn County Levees

      Beginning in the summer of 1996, Board staff conducted geodetic surveys of levees located within Butte and Glenn Counties near the intersection of Highway 32 and the Sacramento River. Levee surveys were conducted in 1998. Permits authorizing the existing levees were reviewed and compared with the new surveys to determine if the levee crown elevations were in compliance with their historical permits and orders.

      One Butte County levee was degraded to bring it into compliance. While review of the data shows that levees in Glenn or Butte Counties are in compliance with the Board-regulated height, letters may be sent to some landowners requesting minor modifications to their existing levees. Staff proposes to update the permit files with new documentation which clearly establishes the allowed maximum levee height based on current surveys, benchmark location, and elevation and what is allowed under emergency operations.

    • Butte County Floodplain Management Agreement

      In 1988, the Board completed the process of adopting a 100-year designated floodway from Ord Bend to Vina on the Sacramento River. This floodway encompassed areas of the Sacramento River floodplain within Glenn, Tehama, and Butte Counties. The floodway was analyzed and mapped, and maps were recorded in Glenn and Tehama Counties. In November 1995, in Butte County, the threat of a lawsuit culminated in the Board entering into an agreement with the County for management of the approximate 100-year floodway. In the agreement, the 100-year floodway in Butte County is referred to as Special Building Zone II and is administered by Butte County using rules and regulations consistent with those of the National Flood Insurance Program.

      Since the agreement was enacted, it was discovered that two major changes need to be made to the agreement. The first change relates to a southern boundary change. The second modification is the need for the agreement to specify that the western boundary of Building Zone II be limited to the eastern boundary of the Board's 20-year designated floodway. The Board's 20-year floodway was adopted in 1972, and the Board retains jurisdictional control over this area.

      Staff is working with Butte County officials to develop amendments to the Floodplain Management Agreement that is scheduled for Board consideration in 1999.

    Lower American River Task Force

    Background

    The Lower American River Task Force comprises a variety of federal, State, and local agencies; community groups; and citizens who meet to discuss and evaluate projects proposed for the lower 26 miles of the Lower American River.

    Key activities/issues

    This group held meetings during 1998 to discuss concerns along the Lower American River. Concerns included stabilizing and strengthening the levees, removing exotic species, mitigating bank protection through planting in the rock, removing encroachments, implementing the Floodway Management Plan, and developing a Habitat Conservation Plan. Board staff reviewed and commented on these documents and participated in meetings of the Task Force and its working groups.

    Division of Land and Right of Way Work Done on Behalf of The Reclamation Board

    Key activities/issues

    • Marysville Yuba City Levee Reconstruction Project

      Permanent levee easements and temporary construction easements were purchased on 15 acres of land involving two ownerships at a cost of $39,800.

      Numerous Pacific Gas & Electric Company utilities required relocation for Contracts 2B and 3. At 11 sites, PG&E poles and lines were moved to accommodate construction. The most significant of these relocations was in the Sutter Bypass where approximately 20 poles were moved. This relocation and several others were at PG&E’s cost because the Board had prior rights or had included language in the Board permit to PG&E that required any relocation to be at the expense of the applicant.

      There was also a major relocation of Plumas Mutual Water Company's irrigation lines on Contract 2B. Since Plumas did have prior rights, this relocation was a project cost of $360,000.

    • Sacramento River Flood Control Project, Mid-Valley Phase III

      Nine rights of entry were acquired for construction. Escrow closed on the purchase of a 0.62-acre permanent easement and a 0.85-acre temporary easement.

    • Sacramento River Bank Protection Project, Contract 42A

      Escrow closed on the purchase of 9.76 acres of permanent levee easements over three parcels of land at.

    • Sacramento River Bank Protection Project, Contract 42E

      Thirty-four temporary entry permits were acquired for conducting topographic surveys along the River.

    • Hamilton City Levee Survey Project

      Fourteen temporary entry permits were acquired for conducting topographic surveys along the river and the "J" levee near Hamilton City.

    • 1997 Cost-Shared PL 84-99 Rehabilitation

      Right of way was obtained to allow repairs to begin in three critical areas along the Sacramento River and Feather River. These included for the Sacramento River--the south levee of the Sacramento Bypass, and for the Feather River--a cutoff levee at Shanghai Bend and a landside drain in Levee District 9. A joint-use agreement was obtained from the City of Marysville in order to certify right of way for the planned slurry wall to be constructed in 1999.

    • 1998 PL 84-99 Rehabilitation

      By working closely with the local maintaining agencies, all right of way was obtained and the real estate certified to the Corps for several Sacramento River basins involving nine reclamation or levee districts. This included access routes and borrow sites. More than 40 prospective borrow sites were identified and the material tested for suitability for construction.

    • Sacramento River Bank Protection Project: Lower American River

      Nine temporary entry permits and four rights of entry were used to obtain the real estate needed for levee repairs for this project.

    • American River Watershed Project (Common Features)

      Staff coordinated with the City and County of Sacramento, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, PG&E, Comcast, Pacific Bell, American River Flood Control District, and various private utilities for the relocation or protection of their utilities to accommodate construction of the American River Watershed Project (right bank). This coordination involved approximately 80 crossings, including approximately 20 crossings on the Garden Highway, that will impact several businesses.

      Right of way was certified for the right or north bank levee strengthening from Howe Avenue to Watt Avenue. This included staging areas, access routes, and temporary construction areas.

    • Property Management Activities

      During 1998, staff managed 52 leases, 16 were for oil and gas extraction. These leases involved more than 18,000 acres of land and generated revenue of over $500,000. This amount includes the sale of a pipeline easement in the Colusa Bypass to Texaco and a sale of excess land.

    • Appraisal Activities

      The Appraisal Unit valued rights of way needed for more than 60 parcels of land for primarily permanent levee easements, with the remainder being temporary staging or construction easements. In most instances, the projects were constructed under a right of entry and, with the appraisals complete, negotiations can begin to purchase the necessary permanent rights.

    • Geodetic Branch Activities

      Cadastral Surveys and Land Records Section

      • Completed 103 requests for ownership and rights including deeds, tracings, assessor's information, and exhibits.

      • Completed 187 requests for ownership information.

      Mapping and Photogrammetry Section

      • Completed 38 requests for aerial photography including flood flights.

      Field Surveys Section

      • Completed 59 requests for field surveys, including cross sections of levees, borrow sites, and channels; as-built surveys of repair sites for preparation of new easement deeds; high-water mark surveys; staking existing rights of way; and tying property corners.

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